Tips to Improve Your iPhone Photography - suzannechristine

Tips to Improve Your iPhone Photography

1. Move your feet!

Your feet are better than the zoom on your iPhone camera. Move in closer, back-up. Change positions/angles. Use the smallness of the iPhone to take photos from unique perspectives.


2. Use your body as Light-Diffuser

For macro (close-up) images of flowers/plants in bright sunlight: try shading the object/flower with your body. The iPhone generally responds better in even lighting, versus direct, bright sunlight.


3.Sunny and Dark Areas?

Use HDR mode on your iPhone for scenery with mixed shadows and highlights. It's best to find scenes that have even lighting, but if your scene has a lot of bright sunlight and shadows (especially for landscapes) -- use the HDR mode. Newer iPhones come with Smart or Auto HDR already turned on.  Remember to hold still, as the camera is taking multiple images and your body's movement can cause blurry or out-of-focus images.


4. Focus and Adjust Exposure

By pressing (and holding) on the iPhone screen (in photo mode) you can adjust the exposure and focus points.


5.  Patterns Create Interest

Look for interesting patterns, details in flowers, plants and grasses as well as light and shadow. While our eyes are normally drawn to the light -- look for patterns that emerge from "negative space" or darker areas.


6. Use your iPhone as JUST a Camera

Turn your smart-phone to airplane mode to emerge yourself in your hiking experience and to avoid being distracted by texts/calls. Use the time outdoors to replenish yourself.


7. Post-Processing Apps

Use a post-processing software such as SnapSeed to adjust color, shadows and exposure.


8. Relax and Open the Senses

Take time to breathe in nature and absorb the landscape before photographing it. Science has proven that nature literally changes our body chemistry and how our brain functions. Taking a few minutes to "soak-up" nature will help you see things that may go unnoticed with a busy mind. Check out this great article on National Geographic's Website: This is Your Brain on Nature.



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